Reports & Results

11th Mind Sports Olympiad

August 18th to 27th 2007

This year I am not directing the backgammon instead I am taking a rest and my good friend, Richard Biddle is taking over in my abscence and it is his reports you'll see below.

#11th Mind Sports Olympiad 2007 – Potters Bar – Diary of a Stand-in TD

By Richard Biddle

Beginners' Tournament

Report

Potter's Bar Cup

Report - Results

Biba Challenge

Report - Results

The Blitz

Report - Results

Olympiad Rapid

Report - Results

MSO English Open

Report - Results

Olympiad Championship

Report - Results

1 Point Wipeout

Report - Results

Amateur Championship

Report & Results

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.



Beginner's Tournament

No Beginner's this year . . .  just like other years!

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.


#

The Potter's Bar Cup (8)

The Potters Bar Cup – 2 day Swiss Format of 6 x 11 point matches.

Day 1 –

A new year and a new venue saw only 5 regular Backgammon players show up to begin with. I was ecstatic as with an odd number, it meant that I would be able to compete. However, with a few minutes to go before kick-off, 3 established MSO regulars showed up as other events had been cancelled due to low attendance. As we all knew already, backgammon conquers all where other games fall by the wayside. It’s not the oldest game for nothing. And no, I didn’t get to play :-(

So Round 1 of this 8-man Swiss tournament finished with wins for two of the MSO players and two of the BG players; the giant-killing of Steve Rimmer by MSO regular Andrew Havery being the result of that round.

Round 2 saw both Andrew Havery and Alexander Baron, players who do not play regularly as the only two with two wins. Uldis Lapikens, who admittedly had played tough opposition, had zero wins along with George Lane, better known for his published book on Mental Calculations. George had just been thumped 11-1 by John Slattery, picking up his first win and announcing “Now I am back on track!!” As the UK’s only representative on the Giants of Backgammon list, it is great that he makes the effort to attend this event. It is a great honour for lesser players to learn from playing and watching players like the charismatic Slats, without risking huge amounts of money. It would be great if other established players followed suit.

Round 3 saw Andrew Havery continue to march towards world domination, wiping out Alexander Baron. Slats remained on track, seeing off Chris Purchase. Steve Rimmer and Ian Davidson had a humdinger that went down to the final checker, Steve Rimmer keeping his cool and winning. Uldis Lapikens rediscovered that winning feeling.

Round 4 - The final round of this first day set up a clash of the titans – Slats v Andrew Havery. Andrew kept to his winning ways. Slats fell back off the track. Steve Rimmer saw off the challenge from Alexander Baron. Ian Davidson kept his hopes alive with a win over Uldis Lapikens.

So at the end of the first day, the non-regular player Andrew Havery leads the field with four wins, closely followed by Steve Rimmer. Can any of the players on two wins put in a perfect day tomorrow to knock Andrew off his winning stride? This challenge will fall to Chris Purchase who plays him first.

Day 2 –

The venue, being a church was being used on Sunday morning, so we all got a lie in. These are always appreciated by backgammon players as most of us stay up far too late playing Backgammon.

Round 5 - Chris Purchase set off to try and halt Andrew Havery and true to form it wasn’t long before the former had a large number of checkers in Andrew’s home board. Chris, it appears, only knows how to play a back-game and he would rather chew his own arm off than play out a straight race even if he was ahead on pips. However, this method worked for him today, as he swept Andrew aside to leave Andrew still on four wins and four other players on 3 wins, setting up a very open final round. All four matches had a potential medal winner in them. Steve Rimmer was most overjoyed as he was playing George Lane, who fairly new to the game was yet to win. But as we all know, anything can happen in Backgammon.

Round 6 kicked off with the following parings, numbers of wins in brackets:
.

Andrew Havery (4)
v
Uldis Lapikens (2)
Ian Davidson (3)
v
Chris Purchase (3)
John Slattery (3)
v
Alexander Baron (2)
Steve Rimmer (3)
v
George Lane (0)

All the possible permutations started to make my head hurt and I figured my tie-breaking skills would probably be put to the test before the day was out. We might end up with four players on four wins. Oh well, so much for getting a quick getaway to watch the Liverpool-Chelsea match down the local.

Chris Purchase was the first join Andrew Havery on 4 wins. Andrew was being challenged all the way by Uldis Lapikens who at this stage was playing for pride, and possibly to do his St Albans team-mate a favour. On the other side of the room, it looked like Slats may also join the players on four wins as he led 10-1 in his match against Alexander Baron. Lastly, Steve Rimmer looked very comfortable against the inexperienced George Lane.

So we ended up with four players on four wins. Looking at their common opponents, as head-to-head didn’t give a clear order; we ended up with two players on two wins. By virtue of the fact that Andrew Havery had already beaten Steve Rimmer, he picked up the Gold, Steve Rimmer picked up Silver and Slats collected Bronze. Chris Purchase finished just outside the top three despite having four wins. Unlucky





Potter's Bar Cup Positions
Pos
Name

Wins

Amateur
Grand Prix

Gold
Silver
Bronze
04
05
06
07
08

Andrew Havery
Steve Rimmer
John Slattery
Chris Purchase
Ian Davidson
Uldis Lapikens
Alexander Barron
George Lane
4
4
4
4
3
3
2
0

78.57

78.57

78.57

78.57

35.71

35.71

14.29

0.00

n/a

9.29

9.29

9.29

6.19

6.19

n/a

n/a

#

#

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

Biba 1-Day Challenge

Day 3 -

Down to a format of 6 x 5 point matches, with 8 players we decided to do a round robin of 7 x 5 point matches. More games for everyone and I was able to play to make it an even number, yippee!! It was fairly close coming up to the final rounds until Steve Rimmer won his final two matches while all the others faulted. He finished with five wins and four players vying for second spot with four wins. Looking at the results of matches between these four players, Biba regulars, Richard Biddle & Ian Davidson had won two each. Richard picked up Silver due to the head-to-head result over Ian, who collected Bronze. It was fitting that 3 Biba members picked up the medals in the Biba 1 Day Challenge, a fun format that everyone enjoyed. I think we will have a few more coming back this week as word gets out that backgammon is the place to be.

#

#

Biba Challenge Cup
Pos
Name

Wins

Amateur

Gold

Silver

Bronze

4

5

6

7

8

Steve Rimmer
Richard Biddle
Ian Davidson
Martyn Hamer
Daniel Rosen
Tige Nnando
Josef Kollar
Kenneth Ho
5
4
4
4
4
3
2
2
100.00
64.29
64.29
64.29
64.29
28.57
7.14
7.14

#

#

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

The Blitz

Day 4 -

Ironically being a weekday, we had the biggest field yet as 10 hearty enthusiasts roughly split half-half between experienced and non-experienced players. We agreed the best format would be a round-robin of three point matches. We achieved this within the time available despite the accusations of me being a slow player. I would like to make the observation that I do not take along time over each move, I just have to make more moves than anyone else. Once again, Steve Rimmer’s experience shone through as he picked up Gold with 7 wins. We had a whole host of players finishing up on 5 wins, so we looked at their head-to-heads. Sadly for one of them, Daniel Rosen, no wins were achieved in the head-to-heads. With no other way to do and no time for a three way play-off, Silver was awarded to Alexander Baron, Martyn Hamer and Alan Berlyn.


#

#

The Blitz
Pos
Name

Wins

Amateur

Gold
Silver
Silver
Silver
5
6
7
8
9
10

Steve Rimmer
Alexander Baron
Martyn Hamer
Alan Berlyn
Daniel Rosen
Richard Biddle
Kenneth Ho
Chris Briscoe
Alain Dekker
Joey Ho
7
5
5
5
5
4
4
4
3
3
100.00
72.22
72.22
72.22
72.22
33.33
33.33
33.33
5.56
5.56

#

#

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

Olympiad Rapid


Day 5 -

After yesterday’s record breaking attendance, it was disappointing to only have four players today. We set off on the task of playing two round robins of 7 point matches. At the half way stage, there were three players on 2 wins. Andrew Havery was unable to record a win in the morning session, MSO fatigue kicking in. For the final round, it ended up with the two leading players playing each other for Gold, the other two playing for pride, the Bronze already being decided. In a thrilling final match, Daniel Rosen picked up his first medal of the year, beating Richard Biddle. Steve Rimmer continued his medal haul with a third placed Bronze.

.
#



Olympiad Rapid
Pos
Name

Wins

Amateur

Gold
Silver
Bronze
4

Daniel Rosen
Richard Biddle
Steve Rimmer
Andrew Havery
5
4
2
1
100.00
66.67
33.33
0.00


.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

MSO English Open


Days 6 & 7 -

A Biba Grand Prix event saw the return of Uldis Lapikens and John Slattery to give us our largest event yet with 12 runners. Special thanks go to Adam Tansley who showed up to be arbiter, with the even number of players it meant he would not get to play so his presence was much appreciated by me, who could play. Slats finished the day on three wins along with Bijan Mehoinejad. Knowing that they would definitely be playing their first match the next day, they decided to start it that evening. Bijan spotted that Slats was a little backgammoned out, having seen off Tige Nnando, Richard Biddle and Alexander Baron. Bijan had already beaten Chris Purchase, John Ingamells and Tomas Kosicka. Bijan had definitely faced the tougher opposition, so must have been a favourite against this mere Giant of Backgammon. Our friendly Giant, however, wasn’t fazed by this young pretender and consolidated his position and, in fact, went on to win his next match.

This set up a thrilling final match against Ian Davidson, who had to win this match to win Gold. Despite getting to the Crawford match and looking in a strong position having made a couple of big plays, Ian had to succumb to Slat’s racing doubles. Winning all his matches, Slats was the undisputed English Open Champ. Ian Davidson had to settle for Bronze as Uldis Lapikens pipped in for Silver.

No match report is complete without a position or two. I have only been able to record one position this week in a match between John Ingamells (white) and Richard Biddle (black). See below the table.

 

#.

..

#

MSO English Open
Pos
Name

Wins

Amateur
Grand Prix

Gold
Silver
Bronze
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12

John Slattery
Uldis Lapikens
Ian Davidson
Tomas Kosika
John Ingamells
Martyn Hamer
Bijan Mehoinejad
Richard Biddle
Alexander Baron
Tige Nnando
Mahmoud Jahanbani
Chris Purchase
6
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
3
2
1
0
100.00
81.82
81.82
81.82
45.45
45.45
45.45
45.45
45.45
18.18
9.09
0.00

24.77

9.29

9.29

n/a

6.19

n/a

n/a

6.19

n/a

n/a

2.58

0.00



11 point match

Black 5  White 5

White to play 61

The top 3 moves according to a Snowie Rollout are:

20/13

Live cube rollout: 0.864

0.875
.

20/14 8/7

Live cube rollout: 0.845

0.859
(-0.016)

20/14 11/10

Live cube rollout: 0.836

0.857
(-0.018)
However, John Ingamells went for the big play of 11/5 8/7. This was a whopping blunder according to Snowie.

11/5 8/7

Live cube rollout: 0.645

0.646 (-0.230)

It was a moment of madness that I wanted to punish, even though I was still not favourite to enter let alone win the game. My feeling over the board was that if I lost this game I would likely lose by a gammon. I was favourite to miss and John was favourite to cover. This was the wrong assumption and one that lead me to double back for the game. If I hit, I felt I would win the game and match if I doubled.

The Snowie rollout shows that I only lost a gammon 45.2% of the time, so I was too pessimistic about my position and was wrong to do a last ditch double. It was also pointed out that just by entering and hitting on the five-point, I was not guaranteed a win and therefore it was not a market loser. However, I wanted to justify my crazy, last-ditch double to the world and pestered anybody that would listen to me about the position.

By not doubling, what was my match equity at 9-5 down? That’s assuming I only lost a single game. Let’s not forget Snowie says I will lose a gammon 45.2% of the time. Approx 21%? How did this compare with the 27.7% after my double? Surely this means it is right to double? Could someone explain if I had got this wrong?

My thanks go to Adam Tansley, who not only put up with me on the day but also tried to explain this position to me when I was stubbornly refusing that I was wrong. He then had to deal with a nuisance voicemail from me as I still argued the position. I then got this email from him and I thank him profusely for the education.

For the record, I failed to throw a hitting five; John covered and promptly won the match.

Adam says: Following John's move of 11/5 8/7, According to my rollout, you win 28% (just under, actually) of the time from here, which includes 5% gammons, and John wins 72% of the time which includes 45% gammons. As you said, if you recube, your match winning chances are 28%. What are your match winning chances if you don't redouble?

.
% of games
Match equity @ resulting score
Match winning chance
Win single
Win gammon
Lose single
Lose gammon
23%
5%
27%
45%
80%
100%
20%
0%
18.4%
5.0%
5.4%
0%
- - -
28.8%

So it looks as though your match winning chance is slightly higher (28.8% v 28%) by not cubing. BUT these figures are cubeless.

If you do not redouble now, then in fact you will win more than 28% of games. Consider owning the cube after you hit. John's takepoint will be 20% (as per the match equity table). Well, you may get to 100% game winning chances 28% of the time, but you will get to 81% game winning chances considerably more often, at which point you will have a redouble/drop.

According to my rollout details, in 5% of games you will reach a redouble/drop position. There will be many more games in which you become a big favourite, but John just about has a take. The net result of the cubeful figures is that your match winning chance after not recubing is around 32%. So recubing costs around 4% match winning chance, which may not sound too much, but actually is a great deal to give up in just one play.

You will hear many players talking about cubing in various positions where they stand to lose a high percentage of gammons, but it is almost ALWAYS wrong to do it (without market losers).

The general way to think of it is that if you lose gammon, it doesn't matter whether or not you double. It is the variations where you are not gammoned that are key (ie. if you hit in your particular example). In these variations where would you rather have the cube? If your opponent owns it, all he has to do is win a single to win the match (which he may well still be favourite to do - consider hitting a late shot when playing an ace-point game, with a crunching board). If you own it, you may not win the game, but saving the gammon will keep you in the match. You may even be able to use the cube to wins games that you might otherwise not have - "snuffing out your opponents residual chances" as Walter Trice puts it. Adam.
.

My thanks go out again to Adam for stepping in as Tournament Director having just got off the plane from holiday so that I could play. And also for this valuable lesson on cubing strategy.

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

Olympiad Championship


Day 8 & 9 -

This competition saw backgammon grow in popularity in Potters Bar with 16 entrants. We had a good mix of players with representation from St Albans, Camden and Biba players. With Biba Grand prix points up for grabs, Uldis Lapikens and Slats were putting pressure on the Grand Prix Leader board.
And we had glorious sunshine for the first time this week and the outside tables were quickly snatched up by the sun-worshippers.

Round 1: The first round draw once again saw the inexperienced George Lane draw the Giant of Backgammon, aptly shortened to GoB, John Slattery. Might we see a giantkilling? My question was, if he is such a Giant, why does he need to stack chairs on top of each other to make himself taller over the board? The stacked chairs worked and John won his ninth consecutive 11-point match during this MSO week.
.

There were no other surprises in the first round other than Jo Davies giving the experienced Monica Beckerson a walloping 11-1. The final match of the round saw Uldis Lapikens narrowly beaten by Andy Kindler who made terrible blunder at 10-7 down, when he failed to see an entering double 4 hit, that could have cost him the match. He may possibly have been distracted by Uldis murmuring mistakenly under his breath that it was a miss. The large crowd of watchers were beside themselves but had to keep quiet. Fortunately for Andy, he held his nerve and won 11-10.
.

Round 2: Andy Kindler’s reward for beating Uldis was a tough match against the MSO Backgammon veteran Steve Rimmer. Steve, the form player during MSO, was unstoppable picking up his second win. Uldis Lapikens, continued his poor form with another loss to Mahmoud Jahanbani. Jo Davies continued her winning ways by beating Slats 11-10. She immediately jumped on the phone to speak to Dodd, her partner who plays a little backgammon but is recognized as not being a strong a player as Jo. I overheard her say she would give him a little lesson when she gets home. Slats had been thwarted from winning 10 consecutive 11-point MSO matches.

Round 3: Four contenders on 2 wins, all to play each other - The solid Steve Rimmer v the jubilant Jo Davies. The aspiring Alan Beckerson v the languid Lawrence Powell.

The majority of players were on one win, but all still had a chance if they won their next match. Steve Rimmer was victorious as was Alan Beckerson, to set them up as a head-to-head in the next round. The secret is out on how to beat Slats. As he lost to an excitable Sue Keeble, it is evident he struggles to beat females having previously lost to Jo Davies. That’s it, next time I am drawn against Slats, I am going to try a little cross-dressing. Any of the female backgammon players got an LBD I can borrow? It has taken a few attempts, but George Lane finally got this first match win of the week and what bigger scalp than Uldis Lapikens. Well done George! Uldis, the only way is up from here after three losses.

Round 4: Alan Beckerson & Steve Rimmer got off to an early start with Alan taking a 5-1 lead; followed by six players on 2 wins, all still with a realistic chance of medals. Lawrence Powell was exhausting himself working out the permutations and quickly went 4-0 down to Nicky Check. Now Ian Davidson was not wearing an LBD but did have a fetching lime green polo shirt. This was enough to distract Slats as the latter lost his third match on the trot. Alan Beckerson held his nerve and beat Steve Rimmer. Lawrence Powell and his permutations failed to see over Nicky Check. In the battle to get off the mark, Larry Bennet and Uldis Lapikens went to 10-10. Uldis pulled through in the end.

Round 5: Alan Beckerson then faced Gerry Enslin, a dark horse who had kept a low profile but had won enough matches to go into the draw to play Alan. Gerry knocked Alan off his stride and opened the competition up again for those on four wins. Uldis Lapikens faced Slats this time round and despite not wearing any distracting attire managed to keep the Giant of Backgammon down whose results were going from bad to worse.

Round 6: The final round had four players on 4 wins facing each other: Nicky Check v Alan Beckerson and Steve Rimmer v Jerry Enslin

Nicky Check had to win and hope that Jerry lost to Steve Rimmer to have a chance of winning Gold. Nicky won his match but Jerry had his own agenda and it didn’t match Nicky’s. So Jerry Enslin won the Gold, Nicky Check, non-plussed, picked up Silver, and Alan Beckerson, by virtue of beating the other contenders, collected Bronze. Slats picked up his fifth loss of the day to St Albans player, Larry Bennett playing his first ever tournament.

 

##

Olympiad Championship
Pos
Name

Wins

Amateur
Grand Prix

Gold
Silver
Bronze
4
5
5
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Withdrawn

Gerry Enslin
Nicky Check
Alan Beckerson
Lawrence Powell
Steve Rimmer
Mahmoud Janhanbani
Sue Keeble
Monica Beckerson
Ian Davidson
Jo Davies
Uldis Lapikens
Larry Bennett
George Lane
Andy Kindler
John Slattery
Linda Taylor

5
5
4
4
4
4
3
3
3
3
2
2
2
1
1

0

96.67
96.67
76.67
76.67
76.67
76.67
50.00
50.00
50.00
50.00
26.67
26.67
26.67
10.00
10.00
0.00

13.42

13.42

9.29

9.29

9.29

9.29

6.19

6.19

6.19

6.19

4.13

n/a

n/a

2.58

2.58

n/a



.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

1-Point Wipeout

How were these points won? Well like this:
Win a single game = 1 point
Win a gammon = 2 points
Win a backgammon = 3 points
Lose a single game = ½ point
Lose a gammon or b/gammon = 0 points

 

Day 10 -

This event was designed to attract the less experienced players to play, in much the same way as the legendary Tric-Trac Tournaments founded my Mad Mike Monk. Slightly different scoring than Tric-Trac which does not penalize you for losing gammons and backgammons. However, we were competing with other popular games events today, including Monopoly so only four players showed up. It did mean that we could have plenty of games, so we chose to have 5 rounds of round robins. The games were played at a ferocious pace which added to the excitement.

After the first round things were fairly tight but Ian Davidson set the pace by gammoning Martyn Haymer. However, by the second round, we had a new leader, Richard Biddle, who remained a front runner to the end mixing the requirement to win the odd gammon and not lose a gammon. In Rounds Two and three Martyn looked to be consolidating Silver, but in the last two rounds he only won two games and lost 3 gammons allowing Steve Rimmer to jump in for Bronze. Steve had previously been written off as he had only 1.5 points on the board after three rounds. Ian Davidson was able to capitalize on Martyn’s demise and collected Silver.

 

 

 

#

1-Point Wipeout Positions
Pos
Name

Pts

Amateur

Gold
Silver
Bronze

4

Richard Biddle

Ian Davidson
Steve Rimmer
Martyn Hamer

14.5
10.0
8.5
7.5
100.00
66.67
33.30
0.00

#

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

Olympiad Amateur Championship

To qualify for the Amatuer Championship players must enter four or more events and their four highest scores are used to calculate the final position, these are shown in red . Congratulations to Steve Rimmer who has collected his second MSO Backgammon Amateur Championship.




Olympiad Amateur Championship

Steve Rimmer
Richard Biddle
Ian Davidson

Martyn Hamer
Daniel Rosen
John Slattery
Uldis Lapikens
Alexander Barron
Gerry Enslin
Nicky Check
Mahmoud Jahanbani
Tomas Kosika
Chris Purchase
Andrew Havery
Alan Beckerson
Lawrence Powell
Alan Berlyn
Sue Keeble
Monica Beckerson
Jo Davies
Tige Nnando
John Ingamells
Bijan Mehoinejad
Kenneth Ho
Chris Briscoe
George Lane
Larry Bennett
Andy Kindler
Josef Kollar
Alain Dekker
Joey Ho
Linda Taylor

355.24
276.41
262.78

181.96
236.51
188.57
144.19
131.96
96.67
96.67
85.76
81.82
78.57
78.57
76.67
76.67
72.22
50.00
50.00
50.00
46.75
45.45
45.45
40.47
33.33
26.67
26.67
10.00
7.14
5.56
5.56
0.00

#

#

 

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

Finally . . .

MSO Backgammon has been around for 11 years now and enjoyed various successes under the umbrella organization of Mind Sports Olympiad (MSO). MSO opened in 1997 in a blaze of publicity filling the Royal Festival Hall and with fantastic corporate sponsorship. My claim to fame is that I won the first ever MSO Gold medal; I played in the Beginners’ Backgammon so there is a special place in my heart for MSO. Before you start asking what I was doing in the Beginners’ Backgammon, I hasten to point out that I had to beat the likes of John Clarke to get to the final. He certainly knew his way around the board.

For the majority of years, Michael Crane has looked after MSO Backgammon; for several of the last few years this has been unpaid role due to diminishing MSO revenue as numbers dwindled. This year, with other commitments he was unable to help out. If Michael was not going to do it, it was probable that there would be no MSO Backgammon this year. The decision for me was either to step forward to look after it or have no backgammon at all. There would always be a 50-50 chance I would get to play if we had an odd number of players show up, which happened in six of the ten days.

By all accounts from those who did come to Potters Bar, the ten days have been a success and I see the potential to build this annual backgammon event to be a driving force as MSO grows back to former levels. This should be an festival of backgammon that attracts all those players who would like to play tournament backgammon but are intimidated by the national and international backgammon organizations. MSO should be a good stepping stone for those players wanting to play more before playing more regularly on the circuit. This should not preclude the high-rollers. We had several expert players attend this year who enjoy playing and studying the game and do not feel it necessary just to play for high stakes. It also allows others to learn from them and, of course, grow the game in the social conscience. The mix of formats offers challenges for all, and the opportunity to play new games.

There will always be arguments about venues, accommodation and location and ideally people would like this to be in Central London, but there is a cost attached to this and unless the numbers are guaranteed it is going to be tricky being in London. We need to grow out of the current venue, which is only 30 minutes by train from King’s Cross. We will never please everyone and, at the very least, it should be a site that is easily accessible to the unpaid volunteers who give up 10 days a year to work at this event.

No decision has been made about the venue next year and I have yet to speak to Michael Crane about his role if he still wants to run the MSO BG. But we are at a crucial crossroads in the backgammon revolution with the growth of online and TV exposure. MSO can help fuel the backgammon explosion.

Next year, I want to make sure this event is properly marketed to all backgammon players. Despite being one of the smaller MSO years for attendance, we still managed to get many people playing many different games and three pages of exposure in the Guardian (G2 27.8.07). I made minimal efforts to market this year due to time constraints and not having a distribution list. It was literally a few emails to mates. Next year, I hope to get co-operation from both the national and international backgammon associations in marketing this as a ten day festival of backgammon. We are not competing with these organisations and I would be happy to promote their events at MSO.

I will be surveying all backgammon attendees this year to find out what went well and what didn’t go well. If you didn’t attend, please feel free to contact me at chelseamuffin@aol.com to let me know why you didn’t attend and what you would like to see in the future to encourage you to attend. All criticism is welcome.

So finally, thanks to all those players that attended. It was a pleasure spending the ten days with you. I hope you enjoyed it as much as I did. Thanks to Adam Tansley doing 2 days for me so that I could play in the English Open and thanks to Ann in the Kitchen Café for keeping me fed and watered. Big thanks to the multi-tasking Tony Corfe for virtually, single-handedly sailing the MSO ship. As a good ship’s captain he is always looking for able crew so if you feel you can help out in any way, please feel free to contact me and I will put you in touch. Thanks for reading.

Richard Biddle




# #

#
#

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

#

Grand Prix Points

The Potter's Bar Cup, MSO English Open and Olympiad Championship, all qualified for Biba Grand Prix points. The points below have been added to the tables here.

 

Biba Grand Prix Points
PB
EO
OC

John Slattery
Ian Davidson
Uldis Lapikens
Mahmoud Jahanbani
Steve Rimmer
Richard Biddle
John Ingamells
Chris Purchase
Gerry Enslin
Nicky Check
Alan Beckerson
Lawrence Powell
Sue Keeble
Monica Beckerson
Jo Davies
Andy Kindler

9.29
6.19
6.19
-
9.29
-
-
9.29
-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

24.77
9.29
9.29
2.58
-
6.19
6.19

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

2.58
6.19
4.13
9.29
9.29
-
-
-
13.42
13.42
9.29
9.29
6.19
6.19
6.19
2.58